Understanding what replaces the ingredients we remove is so important, new isn’t necessarily better, or safer! –

In recent years, though, companies have turnedt o substitutes and tout their products as “BPA-free.”

That’s based on a body of research showing that BPA is an endocrine disruptor — capable of interfering with the body’s hormones — and may have ill health effects. Studies have linked higher BPA exposure to increased risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, for example. But are the BPA substitutes any safer?

“There’s not a lot known about them,” said Melanie Jacobson, a research scientist at NYU Langone Health in New York City, who led the new study. “There’s been much more research on BPA.”

But, she pointed out, the replacement chemicals are structurally similar to BPA — as implied by names like bisphenol S and bisphenol F, two of the most common BPA substitutes.

And there is lab evidence that BPA alternatives have estrogen-like activity. A 2017 study by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found that certain substitutes were actually more potent than BPA in activating estrogen receptors in human cells.

Source: BPA Replacement Chemical May Not Be Safer for Kids