Top 20 Foods High in Soluble Fiber – EcoWatch

Top 20 Foods High in Soluble Fiber – EcoWatch

Great guide on fibre-boosting foods! –

Dietary fiber is the carbohydrate in plants that your body cannot digest.

Though it’s essential to your gut and overall health, most people don’t reach the recommended daily amounts (RDA) of 25 and 38 grams for women and men, respectively.

Both soluble and insoluble fiber help bulk up your stools and can be used as a food source for good bacteria in your large intestine.

Soluble fiber draws water into your gut, which softens your stools and supports regular bowel movements.

It not only helps you feel fuller and reduces constipation but may also lower your cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

Here are 20 healthy foods that are high in soluble fiber.

1. Black Beans

Black beans are not only a great way to give your dishes a meaty texture but also an amazing source of fiber.

One cup (172 grams) packs 15 grams, which is about what an average person consumes per day, or 40–60% of the RDA for adults.

Black beans contain pectin, a form of soluble fiber that becomes gummy-like in water. This can delay stomach emptying and make you feel fuller longer, giving your body more time to absorb nutrients.

Black beans are also rich in protein and iron, low in calories, and almost fat-free.

Soluble fiber content: 5.4 grams per three-quarter cup (129 grams) of cooked black beans.

Source: Top 20 Foods High in Soluble Fiber – EcoWatch

Be careful how you clean in the fight against coronavirus, CDC says – ABC News

Be careful how you clean in the fight against coronavirus, CDC says – ABC News

Cleaning is definitely on the up at the moment, it’s still crucial to remember that, most of the time, we’re using chemical cleaners that can have very dangerous side-effects, especially for little ones –

Soaps, hand sanitizers, bleaches and other disinfectants can effectively reduce the spread of COVID-19 — but accidental poison exposures due to cleaning and disinfectant products have risen dramatically in recent months, likely linked to an increased use of these products related to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning Americans to take care when using cleaning and disinfectant products like hand sanitizer, bleach, sprays and wipes.

In the United States, 55 poison centers offer free, confidential, 24-hour medical advice on what to do if you are exposed to poison, chemicals, drugs and medications. In the first three months of this year, they experienced a 20% increase in calls related to cleaners and disinfectants compared to last year.

Source: Be careful how you clean in the fight against coronavirus, CDC says – ABC News

Raisins are ‘dirty’ and full of pesticides, scientists say

Raisins are ‘dirty’ and full of pesticides, scientists say

Especially as they’re such a common snack for little ones, why varying the fruit you give your children is so important –

Love them or hate them, raisins tend to be a polarizing snack, but there’s one thing we can agree on: they’re dirty.

Shoppers would be hard-pressed to find a way to avoid pesticides on their fresh fruits and vegetables since nearly 70% of all produce sold in the U.S. contains pesticide residues, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), which just released its annual Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce.

Using test data from the Department of Agriculture, the EWG is able to analyze to what degree fresh fruits and vegetables are contaminated with pesticide residues. But this year, their updated guidelines — which include their notorious “Dirty Dozen ” and “Clean Fifteen” lists —  put the spotlight on raisins.

They found that 99% of the dried fruit tested had residues of at least two pesticides. Even the organic variety, presumably produced with fewer chemicals, was packed with pesticides at a rate of 91%.

Source: Raisins are ‘dirty’ and full of pesticides, scientists say

Cleaning chemicals not to mix at the risk creating toxic gasses

A good reminder that being careful with household cleaning products is so necessary –

While we’re stuck at home trying to sanitize everything in sight, it might be tempting to get creative with mixing household chemicals to try to get your home as clean as possible. However, mixing household cleaners can be dangerous due to the chemical makeup of the unique cleaners.

It’s highly recommended to stick to using one household cleaner at a time per surface to avoid mixing chemicals. Vy Dong Ph.D., professor at University of California, Irvine and head of The Dong Research Group, strongly advises against combining various cleaners. “Everything is ultimately made up of chemicals, so unless you know the molecules inside the bottle and how they behave, don’t try this at home,” she says.

You should be especially careful with bleach. According to chemist Alexander Lu of Dong Research Group, bleaches are made up of highly reactive chemicals that make it effective at killing bacteria and viruses, but its high reactivity is also what makes it respond to other chemicals, which can result in new toxic chemicals.

“The primary ingredient in chlorinated bleach is sodium hypochlorite, which reacts with a variety of chemicals to produce toxic gases, In general, cleaning products will fall into one of these three categories, so it is a bad idea to mix any cleaning products with bleach,” says Lu.

Source: Cleaning chemicals not to mix at the risk creating toxic gasses – Insider

COVID-19 Likely Worse for Vapers, Smokers

There’s no better time to quit! –

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Smokers and vapers who get COVID-19 can probably expect a more severe infection, health experts warn.

Many advisories have focused on the risk facing older people, those with chronic conditions such as diabetes, and people with compromised immune systems, such as cancer patients. But doctors also caution that users of electronic cigarettes and tobacco are more in danger from the new coronavirus than the average healthy person.

If you vape, “you’re going to make lungs more vulnerable to severe infection,” said Dr. Panagis Galiatsatos, an American Lung Association spokesman who is also director of the tobacco treatment clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore.

Source: COVID-19 Likely Worse for Vapers, Smokers

Infected pregnant women may pass coronavirus onto babies, small study suggests

Infected pregnant women may pass coronavirus onto babies, small study suggests

There is a chance (though small) that babies can get the virus through their mums. Why playing it safe as a pregnant mum is the way to go –

Pregnant women who have the coronavirus can possibly pass the infection onto their babies, though it’s unclear whether this transmission occurs in the womb.

Although more research is needed, a small study, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics on Thursday, found that of 33 women in China who were confirmed to have the coronavirus while pregnant, three gave birth to newborns who were then diagnosed with the virus. All three infants recovered, adding to a growing pile of evidence that most children experience milder cases of COVID-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, than adults.

Babies born to the other 30 women in the study tested negative for the virus.

Source: Infected pregnant women may pass coronavirus onto babies, small study suggests